Oral Traditions

A, B. ORAL TRADITIONS

 A. Audio Recordings

 

A1. Nez Perce Cultural Camp & Wilson, Elizabeth; Nez Perce Stories. [2008] 2008.

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume, volume 7 of Nimipuutímt. Vol. 1: 1 CD.

Contents: “Track 1: Mountain Goat weeyekin song,” “Track 2: Indian Religion,” “Track 3: River Wind tiiyaapoo,” “Track 4: Coyote Story,” “Track 5: Cannibal story & songs,” “Track 6: Walla Wallapoo,” “Track 7: Medicine Man’s Cure,” “Track 8: Coyote Story,” “Track 9: Coyote Story,” “Track 10: Walla Wallapoo part 1,” “Track 11: Walla Wallapoo part 2”

Description: Stories and songs, religious or otherwise. Stories told in English, songs sung in Nez Perce.

 

B. Transcriptions

 

B1. Axtell, Horace and Aragon, Margo; A Little Bit of Wisdom: Conversations with a Nez Perce Elder [1997] 1997

A Little Bit of Wisdom / Conversations with a Nez Perce Elder / by / Horace P. Axtell / and / Margo B1999.1

Aragon / A James R. Hepworth Book / Confluence Press / Lewiston, Idaho

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. picture of Horace Axtell; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi. blank; vii. ‘Table of Contents;’ viii. blank; ix-xi. ‘Preface;’ xii. blank; 1. half title; 2-211. text; 212. blank; 213-14. ‘Epilogue;’ 215-17. ‘Glossary;’ unpaginated page. blank; unpaginated page. design; unpaginated blank

Text Contents: “It’s Good to Have an Indian Name,” “Strong Spiritual Feelings,” “Grandmother Told Me This,” “Borrowed Language,” “These Old Powers,” “All My Uncles,” “The Old Man,” “They Wanted To Kill Us,” “Warriors and War,” “Inside the Walls,” “Getting Back To My Plan,” “It’s My Turn,” “Coming Back to the Indian Ways,” “Don’t Call Me Chief,” “Washington, D.C.,” “When You Talk From Your Heart”

Description: Transcriptions of autobiographical oral recordings by Isluumts (Horace Axtell), a contemporary Nez Perce elder. Special focus on Nez Perce and Christian religions among the Nez Perce living side-by-side.

 

B2. Baird, Dennis; Mallickan, Diane; and Swagerty, W.R. ed.; Encounters with the People: Written and Oral Accounts of Nez Perce Life to 1858 [2015] 2015

Encounters / With the People / Written and Oral Accounts of Nez Perce Life to 1858 / Compiled and edited by Dennis Baird, Diane Mallickan, and W.R. Swagerty / WSU / Press / Washington State University / Pullman, Washington

Location: La Grande Public Cook Memorial Library; La Grande, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume, volume 1 in the Voices from Nez Perce Country series. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. information on the Voices from Nez Perce Country series; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi. blank; vii. ‘Contents;’ viii. ‘Illustrations and Maps;’ ix-xiv. ‘Foreword’ and ‘Map of the traditional territory of the Nez Perce people;’ xv-xvii. ‘Introduction;’ xviii. blank; xix-xxi. ‘Tribal Elder and This Book;’ unpaginated blank; 1-503. text; 504. blank; 505-22. ‘Index’

Text Contents: “1 Literature on Nez Perce History Prior to 1877, by W.R. Swagerty,” “2 Accounts Written by Nez Perce People,” “3 In the Mountains,” “4 The Earliest Written Accounts,” “5 Lewis and Clark among the Nez Perce, 1805-1806,” “6 David Thompson and Alexander Henry among the Nez Perce, 1809-1812,” “7 Donald Mackenzie and the Astorians, 1811-1813,” “8 The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Fur Trade in Nez Perce Country, 1821-1855,” “9 Botanist David Douglas Visits the Clearwater, 1826,” “10 Encounters Outside the Heartland” “11 The Nez Perce Visit the East, 1831-1832,” “12 Captain Benjamin Bonneville among the Nez Perce, 1832-1834,” “13 Protestant Missions in the Clearwater Region,” “14 Early Catholic Accounts of the Nez Perce,” “15 The Nez Perce in the Cayuse War, 1847-1850,” “16 The Start of the Indian Agency in the Clearwater Valley,” “17 The Nez Perce in Oregon Territory, 1850-1854,” “18 Year of the Treaty, 1855,” “The Nez Perce People in the Wars of 1855-1858”

Description: Collection of written and oral accounts of and/or by the Nez Perce tribe or members of the Nez Perce tribe up to 1858.

 

B3. Chief Joseph. Excerpt from “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs.” In Northwest Passages: A Literary Anthology of the Pacific Northwest from Coyote Tale to Roadside Attractions edited by Bruce Barcott, 7-10. Seattle, Washington: Sasquatch Books, 1994. Originally published in North American Review. (April 1879).

 

B4. Chief Joseph; That All People May Be One People, Send Rain to Wash the Face of the Earth [1995] 1995

That All People / May Be One People / Send Rain to Wash / The Face of the Earth / Chief Joseph / 1879

Location: Nez Perce National Historical Park Archives; Spalding, Idaho

Collation: 1 volume. Vol 1: unpaginated page. half title; unpaginated page. blank; unpaginated page. full title; unpaginated page. copyright; unpaginated page. ‘Contents;’ unpaginated page. ‘Credits;’ i-iii. ‘Introduction;’ iv. blank; v. portrait of In-mut-too-yah-lat-lat/young Chief Joseph; vi. blank; 1-46. text; 47-53. ‘Timeline;’ two unpaginated blanks; unpaginated page. ‘Related Titles’

Text Contents: Speech broken up into untitled and unnumbered sections

Description: Work taken from the words of young Chief Joseph in a speech given to interviewers from North American Review, April 1879.

 

B5. “Coyote and Fox Dress Up.” In American Indian Trickster Tales, edited by Richard Erdoes and Alfonso Ortiz, 63-65. New York: Penguin Books, 1999.

 

B6. “Coyote and the Shadow People.” In The World Begins Here: An Anthology of Oregon Short Fiction edited by Glen A. Love, 3-7. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1993.

 

B7. Craig, Fermore, Robin Richards, and Kim Stafford. “Picking up the Drum: An Oral History from the Columbia Plateau.” Oregon Historical Quarterly 103, no. 3 (2002): 338-61. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20615253.

Note: Includes interviews with descendants of warriors in the Nez Perce War.

 

B8. Hunn, Eugene S., Morning Owl, E. Thomas, Cash Cash, Phillip E., and Engum, Jennifer Karson; Čáw Pawá Láakni: They Are Not Forgotten: Sahaptian Place Names Atlas of the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla [2015] 2015

Čáw Pawá Láakni / They Are Not Forgotten / Sahaptian Place Names Atlas / of the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla / Eugene S. Hunn / E. Thomas Morning Owl / Phillip E. Cash Cash / Jennifer Karson Engum / with / Daniel B. Haug, Roberta L. Conner, Bruce J. Rigsby, / John M. Chess, Modesta J. Minthorn / Tamástslikt Cultural Institute / Pendleton, Oregon / In association with Ecotrust / Portland, Oregon

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. picture of the Blue Moutains; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi-vii. ‘Contents;’ viii-ix. ‘Maps;’ x. blank; xi. ‘Opening;’ xii. blank; xiii. ‘Foreword: Iwaačanáay ‘This Is How It Was;’’ xiv. quote from Eugene S. Hunn; xv. ‘Preface: Áwna Wiya’uyikíkta ‘Now We Will Begin From Where We Left Off;’’ xvi. quotes from Roberta L. Conner and Jennifer Karson Engum; xvii. ‘Preface: Nawapxwiśtáymaśa ‘Voicing Diverse Thoughts;’’ xviii. blank; xix. ‘Preface: Šapásukwatimat ‘For You to Understand the Writing;’’ xx. blank; xxi. ‘Preface: Phonetic Pronounciation Key for Sahaptian;’ xxii. blank; 1. half title; 2. ‘Where We Lived and Traveled’ map; 4-187. text; 188. blank; 189. ‘Closing;’ 190. blank; 191. ‘Kwałánawašamataš ‘Thankful to You All;’’ 192. picture of Wáapnis; 193-228. ‘Appendices;’ 229-30. ‘Bibliography;’ 231-32. ‘Authors and Contributors;’ 233. ‘Illustration Credits;’ 234. blank; 235-40. ‘Subject Index;’ 241-44. ‘Native Place Names Index; 245-48. ‘English Place Names;’ 2 unpaginated blanks

Text Contents: “Part I – Testimonies: Waapaxwináwaša ‘Speaking Words of Testimony’”: Pawiyáninxana ‘They Used to Travel Around,’” “Wiyá’uyt Wapáxwini ‘We Are Beginning Our Testimony,’” “Naamí Tiičaamítimná ‘The Heart of Our Country,’” “Tiičám ku Sínwit ‘Lands and Languages,’” “Núunim Titwatíitin’ Wéetes ‘Our Storied Earth,’” “Walsáyčasminšmi Tiičám ‘The Land of Story Time,’” “Wéeteskin’ix Cùukwe ‘Knowledge From the Earth,’” “Panáykukša Ánimay ‘They Are Gathering for Winter,’” “Pašúwaša Tímanina Tiičámna ‘They Are Cutting Up the Marked Land,’” “Panakpuušayšáykš ‘Caring for a Legacy,’” “Anakú Waníčtna Papáyšinxa ‘When They Bring Out a Name,’” “Patánaknuwiša Naamípa Áwtnipamápa ‘They Are Protecting Our Sacred and Traditional Sites’” “Part 2 – Place Names and Maps: Tiičaminšmí Sukwanáwit ‘Espistimology of the Land’”: “Uytpamá Kútkut ‘The First Work,’” “Naamí Watikš ‘Our Tracks’”

Description: Atlas of place names used by the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla.

Note: Many place names recorded in a language known as Nuumiipuutím, or Cayuse Nez Perce. The two tribes are closely related.

 

B9. Isaac, Mrs. Dave and Skells, Dell. “The Stick Indians.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 225-26. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in Dell Skeels, editor, Style in the Unwritten Literature of the Nez Perce Indians, p. 272 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1949).

 

B10. Isaac, Mrs. Dave and Skells, Dell. “Valley Rabbit and Mountain Rabbit.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 23. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in Dell Skeels, editor, Style in the Unwritten Literature of the Nez Perce Indians, vol. 1 pp. 268-69 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1949).

 

B11. James, Caroline; Nez Perce Women in Transition, 1877-1990 [1996] 1996

Nez Perce Women / in Transition / 1877-1990 / Caroline James / University of Idaho Press / Moscow, Idaho / 1996

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. blank; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi. blank; vii. ‘Contents;’ viii. blank; ix-xi. ‘List of Figures;’ xii. blank; xiii. ‘Individuals Interviewed;’ xiv-xxvi. pictures of individuals interviewed; xxvii-xxix. ‘Acknowledgements;’ unpaginated blank; 1-231. text; 232. blank; 233-38. ‘Bibliography;’ 239-45. ‘Index;’ unpaginated blank

Text Contents: “1 Introduction,” “2 Women as Providers”: “Food Quest and Processing,” “Shelter,” “Clothing,” “Other Items of Hide and Buckskin,” “Paints and Dyes,” “Weaving,” “Other Tasks,” “Agriculture” “3 Life Cycle of Women”: “Raising Children,” “Childhood,” “Marriage and Social Relations,” “Death” “4 Travel and Trade”: “Introduction of Horses,” “Railroads,” “Trade,” “Social Activities” “5 Women in History”: “Women’s Involvement in Council,” “Women in War,” “Other Stories of Nez Perce Women” “6 Religion”: “Native Religion,” “Christianity” “7 Education”: “Nez Perce Traditional Education,” “The Euro-American Education System,” “Women and Modern Education” “8 Modern Roles and Problems,” “9 Conclusion”

Description: Study on the roles of women in Nez Perce culture. Interspersed heavily with interviews from Nez Perce women.

Reviews: Foster, Martha Harroun. “Nez Perce Women in Transition, 1877-1990.” Review of Nez Perce Women in Transition, 1877-1990, by Caroline James. Pacific Historical Reviews, vol. 66 no. 1 (pp. 108-109), Febuary, 1997. doi: 10.2307/4492303

 

B12. Karson, Jennifer, ed.; wiyáxayxt: as days go by: wiyáakaa’awn: Our History, Our Land, and Our People: The Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla

wiyáxayxt * as days go by * wiyáakaa’awn / Out History, Our Land, and Our People / The Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla / Edited by Jennifer Karson / Published by Tamástsliky Cultural Institute, Pendleton / & Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland / in association with the University of Washington Press, Seattle and London

Location: Joseph Public Library; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. ‘Cayuse Sisters;’ iii. full title; iv. copyright; v-vi. ‘Contributors;’ vii. ‘Contents;’ viii. blank; ix-x. ‘Foreword: A Conversation with Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.;’ xi-xii. ‘Preface;’ xiii. ‘Acknowledgements;’ xiv. blank; xv-xix. ‘As Days Go By: An Introduction;’ unpaginated blank; 1. quote by Donald Grinde, Jr.; 2. portrait; 3-242. text; 243. blank; 244. portrait; 245-52. ‘Epilogue: Asserting Sovereignty into the Future;’ 253-63. ‘Index;’ unpaginated blank; unpaginated page. ‘Photographs and Credites;’ 3 unpaginated blanks

Text Contents: “Tamánwit,” “Oral Traditions of the Natítaytma,” “Early Contact and Incursion, 1700-1850,” “Wars, Treaties, and the Beginning of Reservation Life,” “Through Change and Transition: Treaty Commitments Made and Broken,” “The Beginning of Modern Tribal Governance and Enacting Sovereignty,” “Self-Determination and Recovery,” “Other Important Events in Contemporary Tribal History”

Description: History of the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla tribes based on oral histories by tribe members themselves.

Note: Though this book is not specifically a work about the Nez Perce, it has been included for two reason: the Cayuse’s close relationship to the Nez Perce in many regards, and the fact that many contributors for the book profess Nez Perce heritage.

 

Kauffman, John. “According to Coyote.” See D2.

 

B13. Kroeber, Karl. “An Introduction to the Art of Traditional American Indian Storytelling.” In Traditional Literatures of the American Indian: Texts and Interpretations, edited by Karl Kroeber, Jarold Ramsey, Dell H. Hymes, Dennis Tedlock, Barre Toelken and Tacheeni Scott, and Linda Ainsworth, 1-24. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Presss, 1997.

Note: Includes the Nez Perce oral tale ‘píplaats’ or ‘Red Willow’ and interpretation.

 

B14. Landeen, Dan and Pinkham, Allen; Salmon And His People: Fish & Fishing in Nez Perce Culture [1999] 1999

Salmon / And His People / Fish & Fishing / In Nez Perce / Culture / Dan Landeen / Allen Pinkham / Confluence Press / Lewiston, Idaho

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: i. half title; ii. blank; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi. blank; vii. ‘Table of Contents;’ viii. blank; ix-xii. ‘Preface;’ xiii-xvii. ‘Chronology;’ xviii. picture; 1-206. text; 207-17. ‘Key to the Families and Species of Fishes in the Columbia River Basin;’ 218. blank; 219-26. ‘References;’ 227-34. ‘Glossary;’ 235-39. ‘Treaty with the Nez Perces, 1855;’ 240. blank; 241-49. ‘Index;’ unpaginated blank.

Text Contents: “Part One”: “Columbia River Basin: Geology, History, and Ecology,” “The Hanford Site,” “A Brief History of the Nez Perce,” “Celilo Falls,” “Nez Perce Fishing,” “Treaty Rights and the Tradition of Tribal Management.” “Part Two”: “Fish Biology, Research, Species, and State Records,” “Accounts of Families and Fish Species.”

Description: Describes the relationship between fish, fishing, and the Nez Perce. Mostly factual, historical, and scientific. Interspersed with oral traditions recorded by various members of the Nez Perce and other tribes. Stories include: “A Meeting Between Creator and the Animals,” “Why the Columbia River Sparkles,” and “Beaver and the Grande Ronde River,” among others.

 

B15. Landeen, Dan and Crow, Jeremy (compilers and editors); I Am of This Land: Wetes pe m’e wes [1997] 1997, second printing

A Nez Perce Nature Guide / I Am of This Land / Wetes pe m’e wes / Compiled & Edited / by / Dan Landeen and Jeremy Crow

Location: Alvin M. & Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture; Joseph, Oregon

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: 1. full title; 2. copyright; 3. picture; 4. dedication; 5. ‘Table of Contents;’ 6. ‘Foreword;’ 7. ‘Introduction;’ 8-87. text; 88-91. ‘Appendix I: Treaty with the Nez Percés, 1855;’ 92-93. ‘Bibliography;’ 94. ‘Acknowledgments;’ 95. ‘Handford Wildlife Checklist’

Text Contents: “Section One: Culture of the Nez Perce”: “Values,” “Stories,” “Nez Perce Use of Plant & Animal Resources,” “Hunting,” “Fishing,” “Section Two: Historical Resource Use on the Columbia Plateau”: “Nez Perce History,” “Hanford Site,” “Section Three: Hanford Wildlife”: “Birds,” “Mammals,” “Reptiles & Amphibians,” “Dangerous Creatures”

Description: Description of the wildlife of the Hanford area. Mostly factual, historical, and scientific. Interspersed with oral traditions. Stories include: “The Wren,” “Coyote and the Grouse,” and “Cottontail Boy and Rattlesnake,” among others.

 

B16. Macbeth, Kate. “The Nez Perce Meet Lewis and Clark.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 27-28. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in H.S. Lyman, “Items from the Nez Perces,” in The Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society vol. 2 pp. 295-96 (Portland, Oregon: The Oregon Historical Society, 1901)

Note: Thought to be a Nez Perce oral account of meeting the Corps of Discovery, recorded by Kate Macbeth in the 1890’s, though she gives no source and seems to have condensed and retold what may have once been a lengthier and more detailed oral account.

 

B17. Minthorne, Gilbert and Swasden, Morris. “How Fish-Hawk Raided the Sioux.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 61-63. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in Jarold Ramsey, editor, Coyote Was Going There, pp. 24-25 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1977).

 

B18. Phinney, Archie, trans. “Bluejay and the Well-Behaved Maiden.” In Nineteenth-Century American Women Wirters: An Anthology edited by Karen L. Kilcup, 5-6. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, 1997. Originally published in 1929-30.

 

B19. Phinney, Archie, trans. “Coyote and Monster.” In Northwest Passages: A Literary Anthology of the Pacific Northwest from Coyote Tale to Roadside Attractions edited by Bruce Barcott, 7-10. Seattle, Washington: Sasquatch Books, 1994. Originally published in Archie Phinney, trans., Nez Perce Texts. (New York: Columbia University Press: 1934)

 

B20. Ramsey, Jarold. “From ‘Mythic’ to ‘Fictive’ in a Nez Percé Orpheus Myth.” In Traditional Literatures of the American Indian: Texts and Interpretations, edited by Karl Kroeber, Jarold Ramsey, Dell H. Hymes, Dennis Tedlock, Barre Toelken and Tacheeni Scott, and Linda Ainsworth, 25-42. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Presss, 1997.

Note: Includes the Nez Perce oral tale “Coyote and the Shadow” people and interpretation.

 

B21. Spinden, Herbert. “Laptissa’n and the Seven-Headed Monster.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 198-201. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in Herbert Spinden. “Myths of the Nez Perce Indians,” in Journal of American Folklore number 21 pp. 200-01 (Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois Press, 1908)

 

B22. “The Seven Devils Mountains.” In American Indian Trickster Tales, edited by Richard Erdoes and Alfonso Ortiz, 23-24. New York: Penguin Books, 1999.

 

B23. Walker, Jr., Deward E.; Blood of the Monster: The Nez Perce Coyote Cycle [1994, 1996, 1998] 1994

Blood of / the Monster / The Nez Perce Coyote Cycle / Deward E. Walker, Jr. / in collaboration with Daniel N. Matthews / Illustrations by Marc Seahmer / High Plains Publishing Company

Location: Nez Perce National Historical Park Archives; Spalding, Idaho

Collation: 1 volume. Vol. 1: 2 unpaginated blanks; i. half title; ii. illustration; iii. full title; iv. copyright; v. dedication; vi. blank; vii-ix. ‘Contents;’ x. blank; xi. ‘Acknowledgements,’ xii. blank; 1-4. ‘Introduction;’ 5. ‘Table 1: Principal Characters in the Nez Perce Coyote Cycle;’ 6. ‘The Nez Perce Homeland and Their Neighbors’ map; 7-229. text; 230. blank; 231-36. ‘Bibliography;’ 237-44. ‘Index;’ 2 unpaginated blanks

Text Contents: “Part One Coyote Myths”: “Coyote and Monsters”: “1. Coyote and Monter,” “2. Killer Mosquito,” “3. Coyote Defeats the Sun,” “4. Coyote and Flint,” “5. Coyote and Hummingbird,” “6. Killer Butterfly,” “7. Mussel-Shell Killers,” “8. Killer Baby,” “9. Frog and Coyote,” “10. Frog and Blulejar,” “11. Cannibal,” “12. Blindworm Killer” “Coyote the Transformer”: “13. Coyote Breaks the Fish Dam at Celilo,” “14. Coyote and White-tailed Buck,” “15. How Coyote Made Different People,” “16. Coyote Shoots Cow Elk,” “17. How the Salmon Found Out That They Shouldn’t Go Up Potlatch Creek,” “18. Worm Penis,” “19. Cold and Warm Brothers Wrestle,” “20. How the Animals Got Their Names,” “21. How Coyote Brought the Buffalo,” “22. How Coyote Lost His Eyes,” “23. The Sun and the Moon,” “24. Coyote and Winter Have a War,” “25. Coyote and Bull,” “26. Coyote Visits Elk and Fish Hawk,” “27. How Porcupine Went to the Plains,” “28. Coyote’s Trip to the East” “Coyote and Fox”: “29. Coyote and Fox,” “30. Coyote and Fox Pretend to Be Women,” “31. Fox and Coyote as Shamans,” “32. Coyote and Fox Run Races” “Coyote and Grizzly Bear”: “33. The Five Grizzly  Bear Sisters and the Five Woodpecker Brothers,” “34. How the Grizzly Bear Sisters Were Fooled,” “35. Don’t Crack the Bones,” “36. How Coyote Killed the Grizzly Bears,” “37. Coyote Kills Grizzly Bear’s Sons” “Coyote and Women and Children”: “38. Coyote and the Shadow People,” “39. Bat and Coyote,” “40. Cut-Out-of Belly Boy,” “41. Weasel Wrestles for a Wife,” “42. Coyote Marries His Daughter,” “43. Coyote and His Daughter,” “44. Elbow Baby,” “45. Cixcixícim Boy,” “46. Warmweather and Coldweather,” “47. Bobcat and Pinesquirrel’s Daughter,” “48. The Disobedient Boy,” “49. Frog and Crawfish Dance,” “50. Coyote Visits White Mountain,” “51. Sea Monster,” “52. How Coyote’s Penis Became a Dam” “Part Two A Descriptive Interpretation of Coyote’s Character”: “Introduction,” “Coyote and Monsters,” “Coyote and Advisors,” “Coyote’s Interactions with Groups,” “Coyote and Children,” “Coyote’s Relationships with Adult Female Characters,” “Coyote’s Relationships with Adult Male Characters,” “Conclusion”

Description: Collection of Nez Perce folklore surrounding Coyote.

Reviews: Dye, Kevin, and Deward Walker. Oregon Historical Quarterly 97, no. 4 (1996): 485-87. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20614777.

Note: Published in 1998 under the title Nez Perce Coyote Tales: The Myth Cycle.

 

B24. Wayi’latpu and Phinney, Archie, trans. “Coyote and the Swallowing Monster.” In The Stories We Tell: An Anthology of Oregon Folk Literature edited by Suzi Jones and Jarold Ramsey, 198-201. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press, 1994. Originally published in Archie Phinney, trans., Nez Perce Texts, pp. 26-29 (New York: Columbia University Press: 1934)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements